Maintaining A Healthy Lifestyle

Healthy LifeHealthy Life is Australia’s home of ‘feel good’. Register for Healthy Living, Healthy Life by July 31, 2018, and take advantage of our early bird rates. A specialist team of health promotion practitioners and health trainers are available at First Point from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday to undertake a healthy lifestyle assessment and onward referral if required, into a range of health improvement services.

Join Jean Hailes naturopath and herbalist Sandra Villella in the Jean Hailes Kitchen as she makes it easy to see how eating well and simply, cooking from scratch and understanding the nutritional content of what you eat can make a big difference to your health, and the health of your family. Remember to keep an eye on your mental as well as physical health. If you start to feel down and like not bothering, it could be a sign that your mental health needs some extra care, so make sure you tell your doctor or case manager about it.

Visit your doctor for an annual physical exam. Depending on your age, certain lab tests and screenings, such as mammograms, colonoscopies and heart tests, are necessary. Stay up to date on your health screenings to identify whether there are medical problems to address. Adopt bedtime rituals or ways that you can slowly wind down from your day and ease yourself into bed. Try using relaxation exercises to get to sleep.

Unlike in the Rhesus monkey trials, tests over two years can’t determine whether CR reduces or delays age-related diseases. There simply isn’t enough time for their development. But the Calerie trials tested for the next best thing: the early biological signs of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. I eat a variety of foods and get the nutrients I need. I have healthy food on hand.

Since 2000 to 2002, both life expectancy and healthy life expectancy have increased; the population is now living longer and spending more years in good health. Your risk of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease, is affected by your weight and also where your body fat is stored. People who carry fat around their waist (apple shaped) could be at increased risk of chronic disease.