Healthy Lifestyles Center

Healthy LifeHealth professionals, policy makers and individuals can potentially improve the chances of having a healthier life by addressing the complex interactions between genetics, development, and life events and lifestyles. Any loss in health will, nonetheless, have important second order effects. These will include an altered pattern of resource allocation within the health-care system, as well as wider ranging effects on consumption and production throughout the economy. It is important for policy-makers to be aware of the opportunity cost (i.e. the benefits forgone) of doing too little to prevent ill-health, resulting in the use of limited health resources for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of preventable illness and injuries.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is common in overweight people so see your doctor if you have reflux, heartburn or indigestion. Challenges range from getting an extra hour of sleep to eating a banana. Eating too much salt can raise your blood pressure. People with high blood pressure are more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke.

The conference will offer a spectrum of research, interventions and measures that can inform future interdisciplinary health policy, pathways, services and resources towards a healthy life for all Canadians. With its presentation of leading edge research, renowned key speakers, and closing Great Debate”, The Healthy Living, Healthy Life Conference promises to be a dynamic and interactive experience.

Whether you are newly diagnosed with a mood disorder or have been managing depression or bipolar illness for years, you can benefit from a healthy lifestyle. While you cannot change your diagnosis, you can change aspects of your life to manage or lessen your symptoms and improve the quality of your life.

Avoid salty foods and processed foods like pre-packaged meals, chips, cookies and other treats. Avoidance behavior is another key to healthy living. Below are described some of the major items to avoid if a person is seeking a healthy lifestyle. Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1.5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt. Adults and children over 11 should eat no more than 6g of salt (about a teaspoonful) a day. Younger children should have even less.