Healthy Lifestyles

Healthy LifeA healthy lifestyle is important for everyone. Your cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, immune and other body systems depend on a continual supply of nutrients to feed cell growth and metabolism. To get the dozens of essential forms of protein, vitamins, carbohydrates, minerals and fats, you need to eat a varied diet. According to the guidelines established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, your diet should contain mostly whole grains, fruits, vegetables and fat-free or low-fat dairy products. Consume lean meats such as chicken and turkey, along with legumes, eggs and healthy nuts. Limit your portion sizes at meals to control your weight and your risk for cardiovascular and other diseases through your lifestyle.

Not only has Roberts seen the problems of obesity first-hand in her family, she knows the benefits of CR better than most. For over 10 years she has been a leading scientist in the Comprehensive Assessment of Long-Term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy trial, also known as Calerie. Over two years, 218 healthy men and women aged between 21 and 50 years were split into two groups. In one, people were allowed to eat as they normally would (ad libitum), while the other ate 25% less (CR). Both had health checks every six months.

The researchers looked at data from a representative sample of 4,745 people who participated in the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. In this survey, physical activity was measured with an accelerometer that participants wore for a week, and diet was scored based on a 24-hour food diary.

Consult your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen. Do not choose a method of exercise that puts your health at risk. Consider all of the medications you are taking and be sure that factors such as increased heart rate and sweating will not cause problems with your medication. You may need to take special precautions when you exercise, such as drinking extra water.

Let your children know they are not to blame for your illness. Explain this to them while keeping their developmental level in mind. For young children, it may be easier to say you aren’t feeling well or that you are taking medication to help you feel better. Older children can also be affected. They may be concerned about who will take care of them or what they can and can’t depend on. They may be more focused on how your mood disorder affects them than how it affects you. If they do not understand that your mood disorder is an illness, you may want to explain that you are going through a very difficult time but are getting help, and still care very much about them.