Healthy Life Years (HLY)

Healthy LifeHealth professionals, policy makers and individuals can potentially improve the chances of having a healthier life by addressing the complex interactions between genetics, development, and life events and lifestyles. Being overweight or obese can lead to health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, heart disease and stroke. Being underweight could also affect your health. Gerace, James E. “Smoking and Heart Disease.” Mar. 9, 2010. Too much time in front of the boob tube can take a serious toll on your health. In fact, a 2010 study found that people who watched four or more hours a day were 46% more likely to die from any cause than people who watched less than two hours a day.

Our busy lifestyles can be hard on our family’s health. Rushing to and from school and work can make it hard to find time to be physically active. We can also slip into the habit of choosing unhealthy snacks and take-away foods or spending our free time watching TV or in front of the computer. Some people skip breakfast because they think it will help them lose weight. In fact, research shows that people who regularly eat breakfast are less likely to be overweight.

Frequent and routine exercise everyday will boost your immune system. Also, exercise helps to prevent diseases of affluence” such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Remember that your physical health can also affect your mental wellness. Physical activity also improves your mental outlook and may prevent anxiety and depression.

Eat a wide range of foods to ensure that you’re getting a balanced diet and that your body is receiving all the nutrients it needs. The PacificSource Healthy Life Challenge will focus on these modifiable risk factors: physical activity, healthy eating, stress management, and tobacco cessation. Breathing problems during sleep are also common among people who are overweight, and can make asthma harder to manage. If you snore or don’t feel refreshed after a night’s sleep, talk to your doctor.

Data from the Global Burden of Disease ( GBD ) model are an alternative source of trends in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy. It shows similar results to the data presented in this chapter, an increase in life expectancy with smaller absolute increases in healthy life expectancy since the earlier point of 1990.