Healthy Life

Healthy LifeThe Healthy Lifestyles program seeks to address weight-related health problems for children by offering caring providers, family-centered treatment programs, highly trained educators and researchers, and strong community partnerships. Avoid salty foods and processed foods like pre-packaged meals, chips, cookies and other treats. Avoidance behavior is another key to healthy living. Below are described some of the major items to avoid if a person is seeking a healthy lifestyle. Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1.5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt. Adults and children over 11 should eat no more than 6g of salt (about a teaspoonful) a day. Younger children should have even less.

The way you feel physically has a big effect on your state of mind and emotional wellbeing. Similarly, if you are emotionally agitated, your physical health and energy levels are affected. Eating a nutritious diet and being active can help with depression, anxiety and stress. We have several new Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions and Chronic Pain workshops! Click here to register today.

Reducing salt intake is also important to keep your heart healthy, as eating too much salt could lead to high blood pressure – which in turn may lead to heart failure, stroke and other complications. Heart disease is one of the biggest killers of adults in England. Find out how to keep your heart healthy by visiting the NHS Live Well heart health website.

Many of the studies of health expectancy focus on measures such as physical impairment or disability in functional tasks or presence of a specific chronic disease. However, self-assessed health, being much more global and subjective in nature, can incorporate a variety of aspects of health including cognitive and emotional as well as physical status, and therefore provide insights into the needs of an aging society.

Long renowned as a leader in neuroscience, McGill is setting a new global standard for computationally intensive and interdisciplinary research on the brain, made possible with an $84 million investment from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF) Healthy Brains for Healthy Lives (HBHL) seeks to improve the lives of Canadians by advancing understanding of how the individual brain functions in health and disease, throughout our lives.