Healthy And Active Ageing

Healthy LifeHealthy Life is Australia’s home of ‘feel good’. Join Jean Hailes naturopath and herbalist Sandra Villella in the Jean Hailes Kitchen as she makes it easy to see how eating well and simply, cooking from scratch and understanding the nutritional content of what you eat can make a big difference to your health, and the health of your family. Remember to keep an eye on your mental as well as physical health. If you start to feel down and like not bothering, it could be a sign that your mental health needs some extra care, so make sure you tell your doctor or case manager about it.

Eating too much saturated fat may prevent your asthma medicines working properly. Limit the amount of convenience foods high in saturated fat, and choose lean meats, skinless chicken and reduced-fat dairy foods. Think about other things to help you relax which suit you – for example, listening to peaceful music, talking to someone, breathing exercises, Tai Chi or Yoga. If anxiety persists you should also talk it over with a health professional.

Don’t let your asthma stop you being physically active. Choose an activity you enjoy, as this can help motivate you, and aim for at least 30 minutes of moderately intense physical activity every day or most days. Moderately intense physical activity means any activity that makes you breathe noticeably faster and deeper than usual, but does not make you puff and pant.

Most adults need to lose weight , and need to eat fewer calories to do this. If you’re trying to lose weight, aim to eat less and be more active. Eating a healthy, balanced diet will help: aim to cut down on foods that are high in saturated fat and sugar, and eat plenty of fruit and vegetables. This brochure provides information about how healthy habits and lifestyle choices can help with your asthma.

EHLEIS monitored and explored gender gaps and inequalities in health expectancies between EU MS, specifically identifying explanatory factors for convergent or divergent trends. Through the continued updating of an online information system of health and life expectancy, a training workshop and a conference for policy makers demonstrating best practice, EHLEIS aimed at ensuring that the EU and its Member States maximally utilise the Eurostat Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC) and the European Health Interview Survey (EHIS), alongside national data, to compute HLY and monitor population health with both harmonised data and methods.