Asthma & Healthy Living

Healthy LifeThe Healthy Lifestyle Course (HLTH1010) is a compulsory, one-year course for undergraduates to learn how to maintain a well-balanced and healthy lifestyle that will help them to effectively manage their life, learning and work. Some fats are known to be particularly bad for you. Trans-fats, made from hydrogenated vegetable oil, can be found in margarine, biscuits, cakes and fast food. It can raise the level of our ‘bad’ cholesterol, significantly increasing the risk of atherosclerosis which blocks arteries, leading to heart disease and stroke.

The HLY is a health expectancy indicator that combines information on mortality and morbidity and partitions the total years lived at any age into those spent in different ‘health’ states, however ‘health’ is defined. This indicator was preferred to other possible health expectancy indicators such as Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY) or Health Adjusted Life Expectancies (HALE).

A general practitioner (GP) is a doctor who is also qualified in general medical practice. GPs are often the first point of contact for someone, of any age, who feels sick or has a health concern. They treat a wide range of medical conditions and can advise you on lowering your risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. To find a GP in your area, visit the link below.

Engage in physical activity for at least 30 minutes every day. Take an exercise class, join the gym or just take a brisk walk outside. Making the time for physical activity is a necessity and not a luxury. Your mental health can affect your asthma, and asthma may affect your mental health. Talk to your doctor if you have been feeling down, anxious, or aren’t enjoying those things you normally do enjoy.

See how you measure up. Try out at home the psychological and aptitude tests, the instant weight calculators and lots more. Find out how healthy you really are with just a click of the mouse. Teenagers should get between eight and ten hours of sleep each night to be healthy. Quitting smoking is perhaps the single most important thing you can do for your health—and your life span. A study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that women who quit smoking by age 35 add roughly six to eight years to their lives.